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OUR VERY LOCAL SEEDY SATURDAY HAPPENS SATURDAY MARCH 16
WHERE:
Scadding Court Community Centre, 707 Dundas Street West, 11am – 5 pm. (Admission Charged).
This is an event that allows you to browse local vendors and find out the varieties they are offering. One term that you might come across when browing seed packs is “open pollinated” – meaning that the seeds have been pollinated naturally – thus increasing biodiversity versus controlled pollination  which is exactly as it sounds – seeds that can be traced back to a known “parent” .

CROPS THAT FLOURISH AND HERBS WE SHARE
At Fort York Community Garden crops that have tended to flourish are tomatoes, summer salad greens, zucchini, and of the brassica family, kale, chard, and newly fashionable sorrel.  We also have a communal herb garden featuring stock herbs such as rosemary, thyme, sage, as oregano, that allows all gardeners to pick what they need, fresh from the garden. Basil is also grown in this communal plot but , if you use it massively in salads or pesto you may want to plant on variety or several varieties of your own.
We garden so that we can savor the freshness of locally grown, straight-from-the-garden food.  Sure you can plant all tomatoes, or all lettuce, or all beans, but you can also look for inspiration in a recipe – say ratatouille. In French, ratatouille means “tossed together” so its no surprise that this tasty dish incorporates some key plot favorites: eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes and bell pepper. Additional ingredients such as garlic, fresh thyme, and rosemary can be harvested from the communal garlic plot.  could have beans, squash, onions.

PLANTS THAT KEEP OUR HARVEST GOING AND THOSE ICONIC ONE-OFFS!
Gardeners like those plants that keep on giving from summer through to fall such as zucchini, kale, chard, summer greens like any kind of lettuce, arugula, etcl, basil, and chives. For the iconic and awe-inspiring, you may want to grow a pumpkin, or a jack-in the beanstalk that reaches sky-high!

STARTING SEEDLINGS INDOORS – A VERY CONCISE GUIDE                                                            

Many gardeners buy seedlings for ease or because they don’t have room to start seeds in the home.  But to experience the full range of a plant’s growth, and also to save some money, its fun to start at least some inside.

What’s needed:
Seed Starting Mix (not potting soil)
Propagating kit –  or whatever containers or soil blocks to hand – upcycling egg boxes are good too. (see here
http://www.ehow.com/how_7645126_grow-seeds-egg-carton.html) And, of course, your chosen seeds.

TO START
Before planting moisten the soil about an hour before planting.
Follow directions on the seed packet. It will tell you about depths you need to sow the seeds, germination times and best growing temperatures.
Sow a many seeds as you feel you’ll need, and then add some more. If you have too many you can always share with other gardeners.
Once planted to the depth required, keep seeds MOIST, but don’t overwater – a daily fine spray should do it.
If your container doesn’t have a seek-through lid, wrap in plastic and you’ll help keep the moisture in.
When the seeds have germinated, and shoots are showing remove the plastic cover.
When seedlings have two sets of leaves (beyond the cotyledons which are the first leaves to show) you can start to use an organic fertilizer.
And then, before transplanting harden them off by exposing them to outside temperatures: shade, sun, wind…all will serve to strengthen the tender shoots.  Hardening off (on balcony or in your garden) should happen in small doses. 5 – 7 days before the seedlings are, taper off the watering and start to slowly expose them to the outdoors. 2-3 hours in a sheltered sunny spot is ideal for the first day, building up the times until you leave them out for 8 hours or so.
SAMPLE GERMINATING TIMES
Seeds thrive under different soil temperatures – an average temperature is around 75 degrees F.
Tomatoes – 7 – 14 days
Eggplant – 10 -12 days –
Cucumber – 7 – 10 days
Lima Bean – 7 – 10 days
Pea – 7 – 14 days
OUR VERY LOCAL SEEDY SATURDAY HAPPENS SATURDAY MARCH 16
WHERE: Scadding Court Community Centre, 707 Dundas Street West, 11am – 5 pm.
This is an event that allows you to browse local vendors and find out the varieties they are offering. One term that you might come across when browing seed packs is “open pollinated” – meaning that the seeds have been  pollinated naturally – thus increasing biodiversity versus controlled pollination  which is exactly as it sounds – seeds that can be traced back to a known “parent” .
CROPS THAT FLOURISH AND HERBS WE SHARE
At Fort York Community Garden crops that have tended to flourish are tomatoes, summer salad greens, zucchini, and of the brassica family, kale, chard, and newly fashionable sorrel.  We also have a communal herb garden featuring stock herbs such as rosemary, thyme, sage, as oregano, that allows all gardeners to pick what they need, fresh from the garden. Basil is also grown in this communal plot but , if you use it massively in salads or pesto you may want to plant your own.
We garden so that we Can savor the freshness of locally grown, straight-from-the-garden food.  Sure you can plant all tomatoes, or all lettuce, or all beans, but you can also look for inspiration in a recipe – say ratouille In French, ratatouille means “tossed together” so its no surprise that this tasty dish incorporates some key plot favorites: eggplant, zucchini, tomato and bell pepper. Additioanl ingredients such as garlic, fresh thyme, and rosemary can be harvested from the communal garlic plot.
Plants that keep on giving: for plants that keep on giving look to zucchini, kale, chard, summer greens, basil, chives. For the iconic: you may want to grow a pumpkin, or a jack-in the beanstalk that reaches sky-high!
STARTING SEEDLINGS INDOORS – A ROUGH GUIDE
Many gardeners buy seedlings for ease or because they don’t have room to start seeds in the home.  But to experience the full range of a plant’s growth, and also to save some money, its fun to start at least some inside.
What’s needed:
Seed Starting Mix (not potting soil)
Propagating kit –  or whatever containers or soil blocks to hand – upcycling egg boxes are good too. (see here
http://www.ehow.com/how_7645126_grow-seeds-egg-carton.html) And, of course, your chosen seeds.

TO START
Before planting moisten the soil about an hour before planting.
Follow directions on the seed packet. It will tell you about depths you need to sow the seeds, germination times and best growing temperatures.
Sow a many seeds as you feel you’ll need, and then add some more. If you have too many you can always share with other gardeners.
Once planted to the depth required, keep seeds MOIST, but don’t overwater – a daily fine spray should do it.
If your container doesn’t have a seek-through lid, wrap in plastic and you’ll help keep the moisture in.
When the seeds have germinated, and shoots are showing remove the plastic cover.
When seedlings have two sets of leaves (beyond the cotyledons which are the first leaves to show) you can start to use an organic fertilizer.
And then, before transplanting harden them off by exposing them to outside temperatures: shade, sun, wind…all will serve to strengthen the tender shoots.  Hardening off (on balcony or in your garden) should happen in small doses. 5 – 7 days before the seedlings are, taper off the watering and start to slowly expose them to the outdoors. 2-3 hours in a sheltered sunny spot is ideal for the first day, building up the times until you leave them out for 8 hours or so.
SAMPLE GERMINATING TIMES
Seeds thrive under different soil temperatures – an average temperature is around 75 degrees F.
Tomatoes – 7 – 14 days
Eggplant – 10 -12 days –
Cucumber – 7 – 10 days
Lima Bean – 7 – 10 days
Pea – 7 – 14 days

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